cliffs

Yosemite Mountains, Cliffs & Rock Formations

Half Dome
Half Dome

Yosemite Valley, approximately 3,000 feet deep and less than a mile wide, is known for its incredible rock formations, created from plutonic rock that cooled far below the earth’s surface. Some of the most famous Yosemite cliffs, mountains & rock formations are:
  • Half Dome (8,842 ft.) among the most recognized natural features in Yosemite, its western face is a sheer cliff of Plutonic granite - the youngest in Yosemite.
  • Sentinel Rock (7,038 ft.) on the south side of Yosemite Valley, named for its likeness to a watchtower. 
  • El Capitan (7,569 ft.) towers 3,593 ft. above the valley floor. Rock climbers from around the world come to this Yosemite mountain to challenge their abilities on its granite face giving visitors an excellent opportunity to view this unique sport.
  •  Mt. Lyell (13,114 ft.) the tallest peak in Yosemite, its steep slopes are home to the largest active glacier in Yosemite, the Lyell Glacier, which is about 1/4-mile-square.
  •  Mt. Dana (13,053 ft.) and Mt. Gibbs (12,764 ft.).  These stunning Yosemite mountains flank Tioga Pass in Tuolumne Meadows.
  •  Matterhorn Peak (12,264 ft.) is one of a series of peaks that make up the spectacular Sawtooth Ridge on the northeastern border of the park.
  •  Glacier Point (7,214 ft) providing an eagle's view of the valley floor 3,214 feet below from this perch on the rim of Yosemite Valley.